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Acta Biológica Colombiana

Print version ISSN 0120-548X

Abstract

AGUIRRE-PABON, J.C; OROZCO BERDUGO, G. Jr  and  NARVAEZ BARANDICA, J.C. GENETIC STATUS, SOURCE AND ESTABLISHMENT RISK OF THE GIANT TIGER SHRIMP (PENAEIDAE: Penaeus monodon), AN INVASIVE SPECIES IN COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN WATERS. Acta biol.Colomb. [online]. 2015, vol.20, n.1, pp.117-127. ISSN 0120-548X.  http://dx.doi.org/10.15446/abc.v20n1.41946.

The tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) is an Indo-Pacific species. Its global production between 1970 and 1980 exceeded all other shrimp species, which favored its introduction and cultivation outside its natural range in several countries of Africa, Europe, USA and South America. It is currently found in the coast of the Atlantic Ocean (Mexico, United States, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Guyana, Venezuela and Colombia). Despite the risk involved, no studies have been conducted to evaluate their impact as a possible invasive species and their genetic condition. This study evaluated the genetic status and population origin of P. monodon in the northernmost Colombian Caribbean, analyzing the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA-CR). 16 individuals were randomly collected from Golfo de Salamanca and 342 original Indo-Pacific sequences were obtained from GenBank. Parameters of genetic diversity and genetic relationships were analyzed. These results were a total of 358 sequences compared and 303 haplotypes identified. Three haplotypes were identified in the Colombian population. This results showed lower genetic diversity compared with Indo-Pacific populations. These haplotypes were closely related to those found in samples from the Philippines and Taiwan. We discuss the need to create a regional network to characterize the established populations in the Great Caribbean, with the purpose of inferring colonization processes and the establishment of management measures.

Keywords : biological invasion; Caribbean Sea; founder effect; genetic relationships; mitochondrial DNA.

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