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Revista Colombiana de Gastroenterologia

Print version ISSN 0120-9957

Abstract

MONCADA, Diana et al. Prevention of Hepatitis B Recurrence in Liver Transplant Recipients Using Low Doses of Anti-Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin and Nucleoside Analogue. Rev Col Gastroenterol [online]. 2017, vol.32, n.1, pp.1-6. ISSN 0120-9957.  http://dx.doi.org/https://doi.org/10.22516/25007440.123.

Introduction: Hepatitis B results in one million deaths every year and is is an important reason for liver transplantation. The use of anti-hepatitis B immunoglobulin at high doses and nucleoside analogues have reduced reinfection of the graft by 90%. Objective: This study evaluated the efficacy of low doses of immunoglobulin to prevent reinfection of grafts after transplantation. Methodology: This is a retrospective study of a series of patients who had been transplanted and who received immunoglobulin after transplantation at the Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe between January 2004 and September 2014. Hepatitis B viral load, transaminase and serological markers were used to document relapses. Other variables studied included mortality, complications, graft dysfunction, adverse reactions and costs. Results: There were 18 patients with hepatitis B who had transplants: 50% had hepatocarcinoma, 22% had cirrhosis, and 22% had acute liver failure. The median follow-up time was 43.27 months with a range of 14.7 to 65.2 months. Two patients tested positive for surface antigen in the post-transplant period and one relapsed and had a positive viral load at 41 months. The graft reinfection rate was 5.5%. There were no deaths. It was estimated that the cost of using low doses of immunoglobulin was lower than that of using high doses at 6 months of therapy, but no cost-effectiveness study was done. Graft dysfunction was 10% to 33 months. Conclusion: Low doses of immunoglobulin prevented reinfection of grafts in a way that is similar to that reported in other series. While immunoglobulin free schemes have proven to be useful for the long term, low doses of immunoglobulin remain useful.

Keywords : Liver transplantation; hepatitis B; immunoglobulin; antiviral.

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