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Revista de Medicina Veterinaria

Print version ISSN 0122-9354

Abstract

ROA-CASTELLANOS, Ricardo Andrés. Zootechnical reproduction from a new naturalistic ethics (neovitalism) and bioethics as science of survival: the bovine case. Rev. Med. Vet. [online]. 2010, n.19, pp.85-99. ISSN 0122-9354.

For Veterinary Medicine, animal survival is the functional guide-light in order to fulfill its professional purpose. Secondary events, such as allowing feeding or companion, are in fact results derived from the first objective. This article proposes that the most important obligation (Categorical Supraimperative) of all knowledge or human action is life care, including that of animals. This idea means the antitheses for Utilitarian Ethics upon which progressive exploitation and reification of animals have been based. Survival chances for our patients have diminished as a consequence of this phenomenon. A biopolitical correlation between human and bovine population dynamics is shown to contradict deleterious cultural viewpoints for the symbiotic relationships among species. Present bioethical analysis claims for a reformulated Aristotelian vitalism and bovines as worth-to-be-well-treated life forms from humans. Metaphysic figure "temple" as place of respect where life is located is used along the writing

Keywords : bovine reproduction; naturalistic ethics; animal sacrifices; reification; populations dynamics.

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