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Case reports

Print version ISSN 2462-8522

Abstract

VELASQUEZ GAVIRIA, Laura Marcela et al. INFECTED PULMONARY INFARCTION CASE REPORT. Case reports [online]. 2017, vol.3, n.1, pp.49-56. ISSN 2462-8522.  http://dx.doi.org/10.15446/cr.v3n1.60484.

Introduction:

Pulmonary infarction occurs in 29% to 32% of patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The infection of a pulmonary infarction is a complication in approximately 2 to 7% of the cases, which makes it a rare entity.

Case Presentation:

49-year-old woman with pleuritic pain in the left hemithorax that irradiated to the dorsal region, associated with dyspnea and painful edema in the left lower limb of two days of evolution. Two weeks prior to admission, the patient suffered from a left knee trauma that required surgical intervention; however, due to unknown reasons, she did not receive antithrombotic prophylaxis. Physical examination showed tachycardia, tachypnea and painful edema with erythema in the left leg. After suspecting a pulmonary thromboembolism, anticoagulation medication was administered and a chest angiotomography was requested to confirm the diagnosis.

The patient experienced signs of systemic inflammatory response, and respiratory deterioration. A control tomography was performed, suggesting infected pulmonary infarction. Antibiotic treatment was initiated, obtaining progressive improvement; the patient was subsequently discharged, and continued with anticoagulation medication and follow-up on an outpatient basis.

Conclusions:

Pulmonary infarction is a frequent complication in patients with PTE. Therefore, infected pulmonary infarction should be suspected in patients with clinical deterioration and systemic inflammatory response. The radiological difference between pulmonary infarction and pneumonia is not easily identified, thus the diagnostic approach is clinical, and anticoagulant and antimicrobial treatment should be initiated in a timely manner.

Keywords : Pulmonary infarction; Pulmonary embolism; Anticoagulation.

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